BLOG BLOG

WHEN CLINTON WAS ‘GUMPED’

 

For Hicksflicks.com, Friday, Sept. 25, 2020

 

EDITOR’S NOTE: When I was writing about movies for the Deseret News I would occasionally see Donald Trump — yes, our (insert adjective here) president — in movies doing cameos as himself: ‘The Associate,’ ‘The Little Rascals,’ ‘Two Weeks Notice,’ ‘Zoolander.' And if you look up his credits on the Internet Movie Database (IMDB) you’ll see that he has no less than 27 credits in his ‘Filmography’ list and 379 in the ‘Self’ list, meaning talk/variety/political shows on which he was a guest — which includes his appearances on ‘Fox and Friends’ and other shows during the past four years. But it also includes such TV shows as ‘Sex and the City,’ ‘Spin City,’ ‘The Drew Carey Show,’ ‘The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air’ and the daytime soap opera ‘All My Children.’ No kidding!

 

But for previous presidents, such frivolous appearances were something they didn’t even consider — to include the years before and after their presidencies. As an example there’s this column I wrote back in the late ’90s. Under the headline ‘Clinton in “Contact” is amusing despite what the White House says,’ published on July 20, 1997.

 

And, strangely, this does dovetail into current politics when altered videos are routinely used to discredit opponents and promulgate disinformation. When fiction becomes prediction, if you will.

 

President Clinton has been Gumped. And he's not happy about it.

Filmmaker Robert Zemeckis, who won an Oscar for "Forrest Gump," cleverly worked news-conference footage of the president into "Contact," thanks to the advanced computer technology that so seamlessly blended Tom Hanks' interaction with President Nixon in “Gump."

In "Contact," it appears that Clinton is on the movie set with the film's actors, offering up approval of the space exploration program that is the film's subject.

Of course, our chief executive didn't really participate in the film.

The main speech used was given some months ago in the Rose Garden of the White House, and he's actually discussing a rock believed to have come from Mars. Zemeckis and crew simply placed the video of Clinton into the movie, so that it appears he's in a room with Jodie Foster, Tom Skerritt, James Woods, Angela Bassett and other actors.

  

From left: Stallone, Schwarzenegger, Ford, all in their 70s and still doing action films.

Steve Starkey, a co-producer of "Contact," told the Los Angeles Times that presidential speeches "are in the public domain. We didn't alter a word he said. We just digitally replaced the setting. We took him from the Rose Garden to the pressroom."

The White House is not amused, however, and has lodged a complaint with the filmmakers.

Maybe they'd like to put the film in arbitration. Clinton could get into the Screen Actor's Guild, and his speechwriter could receive a writing credit — or at least a fee.

What's most interesting about all this is how well Clinton's remarks fit into the context of "Contact." These particular news clips provide a perfect example of how easily a pontificating generic political speech, which actually says nothing, can be adapted to any situation.

In that sense, it's pretty funny. And I was more amused by Clinton's appearance in the film than anything else. (There was also a titter that ran through the audience when he appeared onscreen.)

On the other hand, it does set a strange precedent. "Contact" may be the first movie to use public domain footage rather than simply hire an actor.

Who knows where it might lead?

Maybe all those 50-year-old action heroes — Sylvester Stallone, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Harrison Ford — will be able to continue doing slam-bang movies longer than anyone thought, with digital computer-generated bodies doing all the work.

They'll be 90, still banging heads and saving the world.

 

And movie producers will still be giving them 25-year-old female co-stars.

  

Wolf Blitzer, left, Bryant Gumbel, Jay Leno, at their day (or late-night) jobs in 1997.

-— CNN RSVP ASAP: Someone else who got his feathers ruffled by "Contact" was CNN President Tom Johnson, whose highest-profile reporters appear in the film, making pronouncements about the fictional plot as if they are reading legitimate news.

CNN's senior news anchor Bernard Shaw, anchors Bobbie Battista and Linden Soles, several field reporters and, of course, Larry King, all show up.

A range of non-CNN types — from Bryant Gumbel to Jay Leno — also appear in "Contact." But because CNN is owned by Time-Warner, which also owns Warner Bros., the movie studio that made "Contact," there has been some question about the ethics of so many CNN reporters showing up on various TV screens in the movie. (Only CNN White House correspondent Wolf Blitzer formally declined.)

Of course, CNN has also been a strong presence in a number of other recent movies — "Independence Day," "The Lost World: Jurassic Park," "Face/Off" and many more.

Johnson said the intention was to help promote the Cable News Network — but now he feels that it has become a bit embarrassing.

Though a formal announcement has not been made Johnson indicated he may not let any of his reporters appear in future movies.

That will be a relief to struggling actors who audition for roles as news anchors.

ENDNOTE: Wolf Blitzer, by the way, has since been seen in such films as ‘The Campaign,’ ’Skyfall’ and ‘Mission: Impossible — Fallout,’ along with such TV shows as ‘House of Cards,’ ‘The Brink’ and ‘Alpha

 House.’


New Movies This Week New Movies This Week

SOMETHING FOR … ANYONE?

  

For Hicksflicks.com, Friday, Aug. 14, 2020

So far the “new” movies that have been opening in local theaters (meaning the Megaplexes), and which have also debuted as online streaming options, are nothing to shout about. Hollywood is, of course, holding its best stuff off in hopes of theaters genuinely reopening at some point. (Although Disney became impatient and put its live-action “Mulan” remake on its Disney+ channel already.)

But the Megaplexes, one Cinemark (Jordan Landing) and the Redwood Drive-In continue to traffic mostly in oldies, some golden, some silver and some leaden.

This weekend you can see these newbies at several Megaplex multiplexes:

“How to Build a Girl” (R). Based on a popular novel, this English coming-of-age comedy stars Beanie Feldstein as an out-of-step teenager who rises from her working-class roots to become a popular music journalist. With Emma Thompson and Chris O’Dowd.

“The Silencing” (R). A reformed-alcoholic hunter (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) whose teenage daughter disappeared years earlier joins forces with a town sheriff (Annabelle Wallis) to track down a serial killer.

“Children of the Sea” (PG, Japanese, dubbed in English). Another Japanese anime offering, this one has a junior high school girl hanging out at the aquarium where her father works and taking up with a pair of mysterious brothers that her father says were raised by dugongs, marine mammals related to manatees.

  

“Happy Happy Joy Joy: The Ren & Stimpy Story” (Not Rated). The controversial 1990s Nickelodeon cartoon series about an unstable Chihuahua and his pal, a sweet-but-dim cat, is profiled in this documentary.

“Sputnik” (PG-13, in Russian with English subtitles). The lone survivor of a mysterious incident aboard a spaceship in 1983 is unaware that his body has been taken over by a creepy alien creature … and the use of the word “Alien” here is no accident.

“Spree” (R). This yarn about a rideshare driver obsessed with social media who turns to murder to up his presence online has been described as a combination of Martin Scorsese’s “Taxi Driver” and “The King of Comedy.”

  

And, the usual (mostly 1980s) “classics” continue to dominate the aforementioned theaters, including “Ghostbusters,” “The Goonies,” “Gremlins,” the “Back to the Future” trilogy, the first two “Indiana Jones” pictures, “The Breakfast Club,” “Dirty Dancing,” etc.

And such post-’80s efforts as “Jurassic Park,” “Hook,” “Space Jam,” “Iron Man,” “Twilight,” the first three “Harry Potter” films and “Edge of Tomorrow.”

And a pair of 1970s films — “Jaws” and “Superman.”

Enjoy — in a socially distanced theater or in the comfort of your own home.


New DVDS/Blu-rays New DVDS/Blu-rays

FULL METAL JACKET

      

For Hicksflicks.com, Friday, Sept. 25, 2020

 

EDITOR’S NOTE: Stanley Kubrick’s still stunning and still disturbing ‘Full Metal Jacket’ recently earned a 4K reissue on video, so here’s my review, published in the Deseret News on July 10, 1987. (And despite my prediction in the final paragraph, none of the actors was nominated for an Oscar, although R. Lee Ermey was nominated for a Golden Globe.)

 

Stanley Kubrick movies are events, no getting around it.

 

When a filmmaker of his stature makes a film only every seven or eight years, his fans tend to look forward to each venture with great expectations.

 

He doesn’t always live up to what we hope for, but even Kubrick’s less successful films — “The Shining,” for example — have so many fascinating elements about them that movie buffs inevitably return to them.

 

And his best films — “Paths of Glory,” “Dr. Strangelove,” “2001 — A Space Odyssey” — are classics.

 

“Full Metal Jacket,” Kubrick’s dissertation on the Vietnam War, is an oddly structured film, essentially in three parts. The sum of those parts may not add up to a classic but the parts themselves are composed of powerful filmmaking, particularly the final third.

 

       

 

   Vincent D’Onofrio, Lee Ermey, 'Full Metal Jacket' (1987)

 

Kubrick has taken a different approach than “Platoon,” so comparisons, though inevitable, are not really valid. Where Oliver Stone followed a rich kid who volunteered for combat and showed us how the war changed him, Kubrick follows his main character – a recruit who becomes a Stars and Stripes reporter – almost incidentally. There is some voice-over narration, but it’s limited, rather stilted and unnecessary. That, however, is where the resemblances end.

 

“Full Metal Jacket” begins in boot camp. You may think you’ve seen it all before, but you haven’t. Not like this.

 

Though the aforementioned main character, Joker (Matthew Modine), is prominent early on, the showstoppers are Vincent D’Onofrio as “Gomer Pyle” and Lee Ermey as the drill instructor. There is little dialogue exchanged here, the soundtrack being filled instead with the obscenities of the D.I. as he puts his troops through the rigors of basic training.

 

The boot camp portrayed here reveals more realistically than any movie I’ve ever seen the combination of comedy and tragedy, humor and heartbreak that make up that eight-to-12 week experience. And the end of this segment is a shocker.

 

Then we follow Joker to Vietnam, where his character is established as a conflicting mix of rebel, trooper, peace-lover and killer. But gradually one of the Marines in his group takes over our attention, Animal Mother (Adam Baldwin).

 

      

 

And before long the latter third of the film takes us to the destroyed city of Hue during the Tet Offensive as this rat-tag bunch of sad sacks find themselves without a leader. The chaos that ensues as they are confronted with a sniper is as powerful a piece of filmmaking as you are likely to see on the subject. It reveals incredibly well the sense of young boys playing war — for keeps — and the difficulty of making decisions in the ultimate stress situation.

 

“Full Metal Jacket” has its flaws but Kubrick’s technical prowess is so overwhelming that those flaws seem largely unimportant. His characters may be underdeveloped, the story may meander from time to time, but the overall picture of the horror of war is clear, and the power with which it is told is at once repugnant and compelling.

 

Rated R for extreme violence and profanity, “Full Metal Jacket” would seem to round out a trilogy of war films by Kubrick — “Paths of Glory,” about the insanity of World War I; “Dr. Strangelove,” about the insanity of nuclear war; and now “Full Metal Jacket.”

 

Summer seems an odd time to release a movie of this intensity but maybe it’s just what we need in the midst of all the standard silly movies out right now.

 

And you can bet on Baldwin, D’Onofrio and Ermey as strong contenders for next year’s Oscar race.


Welcome Welcome

Hi. I'm Chris Hicks.

But if you're looking for Chris Hicks the Australian rugby player or the American recording-industry executive or the Major League Baseball player or the author of "Think" or the singer-songwriter or the former basketball player, you're in the wrong place.

I'm Chris Hicks the movie guy from Salt Lake City. If that's who you're looking for, welcome to my website as I enter the 21st century … a little late (May 2013).

This site is all about movies, well mostly, and it's also about me, I guess, but I'll try to keep my ego in check.

My goal, my hope, is that you will be able to browse the pages here and be alerted to or reminded of some great movie you've never heard of or forgotten about. In other words, something that might enhance your movie-watching experience, whether it's by Alfred Hitchcock or Joss Whedon, or stars Audrey Hepburn or Jennifer Lawrence or someone you never heard of. And I've also tried to make it fun.

The bulk of stories and reviews here are gleaned (with permission) from my 40 years of writing about film for the Deseret News, a daily newspaper in Salt Lake City, with side trips here and there to other entertainment forms.

I'm no longer writing for the D-News so this is mostly archival stuff, primarily from the Deseret News but also from my 13 years with KSL Television and Radio, as well as other sundry freelance things I occasionaly come across in my deteriorating hard-copy files.

Hope you enjoy my little site. If you do, tell your friends. If you don't, just say you couldn't find it.

Cheers,
Chris H.

Shameless Hucksterism Shameless Hucksterism

 

Click here for Deseret News interview.

Click here for Deseret News review.

Click here for Amazon store.

Golden Oldies On the Big Screen Golden Oldies On the Big Screen

AKIRA

       

For Hicksflicks.com, Friday, Sept. 25, 2020

 

EDITOR’S NOTE: This popular Japanese anime feature has been brought back to theaters this weekend (playing in several Cinemark and Megaplex multiplexes around town) and fans will be happy to see it on the big screen, perhaps for the first time. My review was published in the Deseret News on March 30, 1990. (Although, as noted here, the film was unrated in 1990, it was given an R rating for a 2001 anniversary home-video release.)

 

"Akira" is an animated feature but don't let visions of talking ducks and dancing hippos fill your mind. This is adult fare, aimed at hard-core science-fiction fans.

 

Further, it's so violent and bloody that if the film was live-action it would easily get an R rating. Come to think of it, maybe it would get an R rating anyway. (There are also a few profanities and a scene with nudity.)

 

The ads hype "Akira" as a cross between "Heavy Metal," the animated sci-fi anthology, and Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner." The comparison is apt, since the concept owes something to "Heavy Metal's" rude, gritty animation style and the scenes of "Neo-Tokyo," some 30 years into the future, starkly resemble Scott's vision of 21st-century Los Angeles. (And like "Blade Runner," "Akira" gives much more emphasis to the visual style than the story.)

 

After that there are a lot of other movies that come to mind while watching "Akira," from "Star Wars" to "Superman," but chiefly Brian DePalma's "The Fury" and David Cronenberg's "Scanners" — right down to the one-on-one duel-of-the-telekinetics.

 

       

 

But being animated, "Akira" has a lot more freedom than those films, in terms of its visual imagery, and stylistically it's all over the map.

 

The film's "look" is significant, since "Akira" is aimed at animation, sci-fi and comic book buffs — it is based on the comic book … er, "graphic novel" … by Katsuhiro Otomo, published here by Epic Comics. (Budgeted at $7 million, this is also Japan's most expensive animated feature.)

 

But the plot is less successful.

 

A convoluted, muddled mixture of decades' worth of science fiction and fantasy themes, the story begins with a couple of biker gangs battling it out in the streets of Neo-Tokyo, built on the remains of Tokyo Bay in the year 2019, 31 years after World War III.

 

During one confrontation on their hyper-speed motorcycles, a junior member of one of the gangs is injured and spirited off by evil government officials to a hospital. There a doctor discovers he has telepathic and telekinetic powers.

 

Before the boy's powers can be harnessed, however, he escapes and wreaks havoc on the city, with his friends and other government experimental telekinetics trying to help him. Eventually, however, they realize that all they can do is try to stop him.

 

       

 

Anyone who's read or watched much science fiction will recognize the themes here, right down to the most basic — the "1984"-style government structure. And the battles, whether involving mobs of people or one-on-one confrontations, become rather redundant after awhile. (Some of the English dubbing is a bit strange, as when a couple of Japanese natives seem to have affected Brooklyn accents. And why do so many characters grimace and growl?)

 

Worst of all, the film is more than two hours long, which is much too lengthy to sustain interest in an animated feature, even if the story were more compelling.

 

But it is the animation that is the draw here, so to speak. And some of the imagery is nothing short of stunning. (The hallucinations of experimental victims are especially effective.) And the musical score is also very good.

 

So keep in mind that the three-star rating is strictly for avid fans of the genre. Anyone else should beware.


Oldies New to DVD/Blu-ray Oldies New to DVD/Blu-ray

BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA

       

For Hicksflicks.com, Friday, Sept. 25, 2020

 

EDITOR’S NOTE: With its recent Shout! Factory reissue in a Blu-ray ‘Collector’s Edition’ with copious new bonus features, ‘Big Trouble in Little China’ — a real change of pace for director John Carpenter, of ‘Halloween’ and ‘The Thing’ fame — is worth looking back at again. My review was published in the Deseret News on July 4, 1986.

 

“Big Trouble In Little China” is very funny, in an oddball “Buckaroo Banzai” kind of way, with Kurt Russell and Dennis Dun as gambling buddies who team up to take on an evil ghost, the spirit of a 2,000-year-old sorcerer. That ghost is searching for a green-eyed woman to sacrifice so he can once again become flesh and bone.

 

Russell is truck driver Jack Burton who is drawn into the adventure by his friend Wang Chi (Dun). Initially all Burton wants is a gambling debt Chi owes him, but when his truck is stolen, and his livelihood along with it, Burton is forced to join in.

 

Burton and Dun trade quips and battle the bad guys together, but while Dun is revealed to be a full-fledged hero (in a deadpan spoof of Bruce Lee martial arts pictures), Burton is little more than a good-natured oaf.

 

       

 

Kim Cattrall, left, Kurt Russell, Dennis Dun, Suzee Pai, 'Big Trouble in Little China' (1986)

 

The plot is complex and more than a little ridiculous, but director John Carpenter (who also did the music) keeps the pace moving so fast you won’t notice until it’s all over. And by then you probably won’t care.

 

W.D. Richter, who gave us “The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai,” is credited here with “story adaptation,” and some of the dialogue has that “Buckaroo Banzai” ring to it. When the chief heroine, for example, is told the evil ghost’s victim is a woman with green eyes, she says with a straight face, “That’s like patent-leather bucket seats; it doubles the price.”

 

Probably the most interesting aspect of “Big Trouble in Little China” is that it appears to be the first flat-out spoof of “Rambo,” as well as an obvious Indiana Jones knock-off. With his John Wayne swagger and his Inspector Clouseau klutziness, Russell’s character is also something of a variation on Tom Selleck’s “Magnum, P.I.,” though more of a male chauvinist. Despite Russell’s macho, redneck attitudes, however, he gives Jack Burton a warmth that belies his outward facade.

 

       

 

Dennis Dun’s Wang Chi could have been little more than just another “sidekick” character but Carpenter and Dun have made him an equal partner to Jack Burton, in laughs and heroics — and in fact, he repeatedly surpasses Burton in the latter, beating up the bad guys while Burton bumbles along.

 

Kim Cattrall’s character, a hard-nosed attorney, is not very well developed but she does get a few laughs and provides Russell with some romance. Victor Wong (also in the current “Dim Sum”) fares much better as the good-guy sorcerer, who drives a Chinatown tour bus on the side. Wong is something of a Chinese Wilford Brimley, excellent in everything he does.

 

“Big Trouble in Little China” which is quite violent for its PG-13 rating, isn’t going to win any awards. But during a summer when there is no “Indiana Jones” movie, a pseudo-Indiana Jones will do.