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ET TWO, ‘PSYCHO’?

       

For Hicksflicks.com, Friday, Oct. 23, 2020

 

EDITOR’S NOTE: This 37-year-old column was about a movie I had not yet seen but which had become so highly anticipated that I couldn’t resist some speculation. When ‘Psycho II’ did eventually open, my review was mostly positive, with reservations about the final act. Still, reading his again amused me; hope if makes pleasant reading for you as well. This was a ‘Hicks On Flicks’ column published under the headline, ‘After 22 years in a padded cell … ,” on May 8, 1983.

 

“Psycho” is one of my favorite horror movies.

 

The shower scene, of course, was so perfectly realized and terrifying that people took baths for months after the film’s release. Then there was that horrific house on the hill above the motel. And the final scene with Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates, sitting in his padded cell, thinking to himself that he was so serene, “I won’t even swat that fly.”

 

Well, next month we’ll find out if he ever did swat that fly.

 

“Psycho II” is coming. And whether that’s good news or bad news, depends on how you feel about the original film, Alfred Hitchcock’s work and the films made by the many pseudo-Hitchcock directors who imitate him.

 

Regardless of how you feel about it, though, it’s coming, with Anthony Perkins reprising his infamous role as the man obsessed with his taxidermic mother, returning home after spending 22 years in an institution. Vera Miles will also be on hand once more (she played Janet Leigh’s sister, the one who ultimately found Norman’s mother in the basement).

 

       

 

                      Janet Leigh, 'Psycho' (1960)

 

That such a sequel was made, coming out 23 years after the original, is unusual, of course. That it retains two of the original cast members is even more unusual. The real surprise, however, is the advance word we’re getting on the picture.

 

Reliable sources suggest the film is actually quite good on its own merits, that even though Richard Franklin — the Australian director of “Patrick” and “Road Games,” both rather Hitchish — is an admitted bona fide Hitchcock freak and has paid homage to his mentor in every scene, “Psycho II” apparently has some twists and turns of its own that are guaranteed to jolt you. And it’s reportedly relatively bloodless, despite the R rating.

 

That the script is by Tom Holland, author of the horrid “The Beast Within,” excites me less, but let’s not forget that even Hitch had some clunkers.

 

When the project was first announced I had natural misgivings. I’ve always considered “Psycho” a consummate picture, and I’m never too thrilled about modern moviemakers messing with classics, anyway (I can’t bring myself to turn on the TV version of “Casablanca”). But the more I thought about it, the more intrigued I became by the idea of “Psycho II.”

 

       

 

Then I began to come up with my own little scenarios.

 

What if Bates came home and we found out he didn’t murder Janet Leigh after all? How about if Vera Miles killed her own sister and put the blame on Bates? Or what if there was an extension of “Psycho’s” final moment, when the car is being pulled out of the lake? Suppose the trunk contained another stuffed body, this one of Bates’ father, and a connection developed between the Bates family, and that of Miles and Leigh? Or what if ghostly spirits came into the picture?

 

Too wild? Perhaps, but I’ll bet whatever surprises “Psycho II” comes up with are no wilder.

 

The one element that causes me to still be wary, though, is a photo included in the press kit that recently arrived form Universal Pictures: Young actress Meg Tilly in a shower.

 

It’s hard for me to believe that after all the films that have spoofed “Psycho’s” shower scene (Brian DePalma’s “Phantom of the Paradise,” Mel Brooks’ “High Anxiety,” etc. – even Perkins himself on TV’s “Saturday Night Live”) any audience can see a similar moment crop up in the sequel without laughing.

 

We’ll see.