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SAME AS IT EVER WAS

 

For Hicksflicks.com, Friday, Aug. 14, 2020

EDITOR’S NOTE: One weekend last month, with few movie theaters open to the public during the current pandemic — and with those that are open dominated by 1980s ‘classics’ — a 36-year-old movie became the No. 1 box-office hit in the nation: ‘Ghostbusters.’ So let’s take a look back at August 1984 when the summer was wrapping up and yours truly was assessing the damage for the Deseret News. As it happens, ‘Ghostbusters’ would go on to become the year’s biggest moneymaker, and four of the top 10 were also summer flicks; No. 2 was ‘Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom,’ followed by ‘Gremlins’ (No. 3), ‘The Karate Kid’ (No. 4) and “Star Trek III: The Search for Spock’ (No. 8). The moviegoing public had spoken! This ‘Hicks on Flicks’ column was published on Aug. 19, 1984.

Unless there’s some surprise coming I don’t know about — that is, unless “Body Rock” or “Oxford Blues” turns out to be an exceptionally wonderful sleeper — the summer verdict is pretty well in.

“Ghostbusters” is the winner and reigning champ, and indeed one of the summer’s brightest and best films.

Meanwhile, though they still made a box-office killing, “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” and “Gremlins” are licking the critical wounds of Steven Spielberg backlash. Even critics who raved about the films when they first viewed them seem to be backing down a bit in the light of more recent criticisms of those films and of Spielberg himself.

And while it may be true that Spielberg is “imitating himself,” and going for fast pacing and shock effects over character and story, those films are, for me at least, still highly entertaining and wonderfully fanciful.

Every summer has its sleeper  and “The Karate Kid” was unexpectedly a pleasantly surprising box-office and critical hit, one which seemed to open the floodgates for family films.

Most of the other movies that were aimed at children and their parents came at the end of the summer, following “The Karate Kid.” Late in July we got “Marvin and Theo,” “The Last Starfighter,” “The Neverending Story” and “The Muppets Take Manhattan,” and this month brought “The Lucky Star” and “Cloak & Dagger.”

      

Ralph Macchio, left, Pat Morita, 'The Karate Kid' (1984)

And that will most certainly be the last of the family fare we will see until Christmas, or at least that’s how it appears right now.

Fall, traditionally a time for “serious” films — those with higher aspirations than most and those that begin to aim seriously for Oscar nominations — will not be much different this year in content. It will differ, however, in the number of films scheduled.

Each month between now and December has from 10 to 15 major movies on the calendar, a most unusual phenomenon. And December, always a big month, has some 20 on the schedule.

Some of the upcoming Christmas films already have previews showing in the theaters, including the two big sci-fi films “Dune” and “2010: Odyssey Two.” In addition there is “Supergirl,” John Carpenter’s “Starman,” Neil Simon’s “The Slugger’s Wife,” David Lean’s “A Passage to India” and Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Cotton Club.” Along with a detective film starring both Clint Eastwood and Burt Reynolds, a thriller with Tom Selleck, and comedies starring Goldie Hawn, Eddie Murphy and Michael Keaton, respectively.

December, as you might gather from that list, is a big-budget blockbuster month. The fall months preceding December, on the other hand, usually go for smaller films.

Those scheduled for September include a comedy, of all things, Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin in “All of Me,” but most will be much more serious – “Country,” with Jessica Lange, Sam Shepard and Wilford Brimley; “Amadeus,” based on the stage production about Mozart; “Places in the Heart,” with Sally Field; Under the Volcano,” with Albert Finney and Jacqueline Bisset; “Irreconcilable Differences,” with Ryan O’Neal, Shelley Long and Drew Barrymore; and “A Soldier’s Story,” with Howard E. Rollins Jr., who was so memorable as Coalhouse Walker in “Ragtime.”

      

Ke Huy Quan, left Kate Capshaw, Harrison Ford, 'Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom' (1984)

Among those scheduled for October are Bill Murray’s dramatic debut, “The Razor’s Edge”; “Songwriter,” with Willie Nelson and Kris Kristofferson; Brian De Palma’s “Body Double”; “Little Drummer Girl,” with Diane Keaton; and, for a bit of lighter fare, Paul McCartney’s “Give My Regards to Broad Street,” with McCartney and his wife Linda, along with Ringo Starr.

Even lighter is one of November’s films, the third in the “Oh, God!” series, again with George Burns.

Looking for possible Oscar fare among films that have not yet been seen is a fool’s game, of course, though Albert Finney, Diane Keaton and David Lean are always fairly secure bets. But there have been so far very few films that look like qualifiers and one is tempted to speculate that nary a single film up to now will receive a nomination in a major category.

There are possible exceptions, of course. A fairly strong contender might be Anthony Hopkins for his excellent portrait of Capt. Bligh in “The Bounty,” but that may not come to pass since the film flopped at the box office. Lesser possibilities, though they are certainly deserving, would be Mia Farrow for “Broadway Danny Rose,” John Lone for “Iceman,” Wilford Brimley for “The Stone Boy” and Pat Morita for “The Karate Kid.”

But I haven’t seen a single film so far this year I would put money on as a contender for “best picture.” It would appear those and any other strong contenders for ’84 will come from films released in the final months of the year.

One thing remains certain, however. Those who avidly search out movies to see will not have their usual idle period during the fall this year.

It’s enough to make a critic look forward to Christmas.