Atrás

SEX, ACTION, HORROR ... THE USUAL

For Hicksflicks.com, April 25, 2014

Cameron Diaz stars in a sex comedy, the late Paul Walker stars in a remake of a French action film and horror, wartime drama and a documentary open as well — seven films this week. After nine openings last week, we now officially have way more new movies in theaters that no one wants to see than we have lingering hits that people do want to see.

"The Other Woman" (PG-13) is a comedy starring Diaz as the title character, who discovers her boyfriend is married and also cheating with a third woman. So the three women team up to form "The First Wives Club," or something akin to that if the trailers are to be believed.

"Brick Mansions" (PG-13) is a remake of the brilliant 2004 French thriller "District B13," which was a showcase for stunning parkour stunt work (without any CGI, thank you). Here, Walker teams up with the star of the French film (David Belle) to fight bad guys in a futuristic, dystopian Detroit.

"The Quiet Ones" (PG-13), set in the 1970s, revolves around science students experimenting with a disturbed young woman who may be inhabited by a poltergeist. Spooky shenanigans ensue.

"Walking With the Enemy" (PG-13) is the true story set during World War II of a Hungarian Jew (Jonas Armstrong) who impersonates a Nazi SS officer to rescue other Jews, while a parallel story follows a Hungarian regent (Ben Kingsley) who is given an untenable choice by Nazi leaders.

"The Railway Man" (R) is playing exclusively at the Broadway Centre Cinemas downtown, another true World War II story, this one with Colin Firth as a former British Army officer suffering from apparent PTSD, with flashbacks revealing how he was tormented in a Japanese labor camp. Then his wife (Nicole Kidman) comes across Firth's former tormentor. Should she tell him and risk the consequences?

"Jodorowsky's Dune" (PG-13) is also at the Broadway, a documentary about eccentric filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky's failed attempt during the mid-1970s to mount an ambitious adaptation of Frank Herbert's 1965 sci-fi novel "Dune." (It was eventually filmed by David Lynch in the 1980s and became a notorious bomb.)

"Joe" (R), a new, highly touted little character film starring Nicolas Cage comes on the heels of rave reviews. Cage plays an ex-con who becomes a parental figure for a troubled young boy. This one's exclusively at the Tower Theater.