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DOG DAYS OF SUMMER FLICKS

     

Steven Spielberg on the set of 'The Lost World: Jurassic Park' (1997), preparing to kill the dog, perhaps?

For Hicksflicks.com, Friday, June 14, 2019

EDITOR’S NOTE: The recent box-office hit ‘John Wick, Chapter 3: Parabellum’ is still in theaters, the third in a film trilogy that began with bad guys fatally shooting the title character’s dog. And all three movies are all about obeying the rules. Or not. Which reminded me that some 22 years ago I wrote a column about how dogs were never killed in action movies … unless Steven Spielberg was the director. It’s a rule. Or it WAS a rule. Well, OK, it’s just a rule I made up. Published on Aug. 3, 1997, this ‘Hicks on Flicks’ column (actually, just the first half of a longer column that was also about another subject) ran under the headline, ‘Only Spielberg has the guts to kill “The Dog” in films.’

More things I found myself thinking about when I should have been paying better attention to the movies:             

Only Steven Spielberg can kill The Dog.

In action movies, The Dog always survives.

Dozens — even hundreds — of human beings may perish in disaster thrillers, but The Dog always manages to escape. And usually comes out as unscathed as the hero.

This has been an especially prolific cliché since "Independence Day" last year, when Vivica A. Fox's pooch barely escaped a blast in a tunnel filled with cars that flew end over end.

As a result, "Independence Day" set the tone — the First Lady may bite the dust, but not The Dog.

     

It's no surprise when Boomer the dog barely escapes with his life in 'Independence Day' (1996).

Further examples:

    — In "Daylight," Sylvester Stallone leads a small band of survivors out of a tunnel that has been sealed at both ends and is on the verge of collapsing under the Hudson River. Will The Dog drown in one of those dangerous underwater undertakings, or will it prove to be a better swimmer than some of the humans?

    — In "Dante's Peak," after a volcano loses its cool in the Great Northwest, The Dog is perched on a rock that is surrounded by molten lava. Pierce Brosnan drives by in a jeep (that apparently has fireproof tires) but will he be able to save our four-pawed friend from a serious hot foot?

    — In "Volcano," after Los Angeles residents have been the victims of a volcanic eruption beneath the city, The Dog is trapped in a burning house. Will Tommy Lee Jones and friends get Rover outta there before the timbers collapse?

    — In "Speed 2: Cruise Control," after Sandra Bullock and Jason Patric have been battling bad guy Willem Dafoe for two hours, The Dog is on a small boat that is about to be smashed to smithereens. Will the little guy somehow survive the wreckage?

    — And in "Spawn," The Dog disappears after a violent fight between the title character (Michael Jai White) and the evil Clown (John Leguizamo), with only its collar left intact. Will "Spaz" surprise the audience by showing up safe and sound in the final reel?

The answer to all of these questions is, of course, a resounding "Yes."

     

In 1997 it was very unexpected when the T. rex in 'The Lost World: Jurassic Park' turned this pooch into a dino hors d'oeuvres (off-screen, of course).

It's a movie. And they never kill The Dog in a movie.

Unless the movie is directed by the mighty Steven Spielberg. He isn't one to follow the crowd. And he may be the only guy with enough clout to get away with this kind of thing.

So, in "The Lost World: Jurassic Park," The Dog is depicted as a pet in suburban San Diego when the T. Rex tramples the backyard while using the swimming pool as a watering hole.

And though the moment is not graphically demonstrated (it occurs off screen), the audience is made painfully aware that the T. Rex has turned The Dog into a dino-munchie.

Thus, the new Movie Rule: Only Steven Spielberg can kill The Dog.

And even Spielberg won't SHOW The Dog being killed.